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I'm healthy now, but could I ever need SSD benefits?

People who are able-bodied and free of mental illness may not think that they will ever become disabled. It is natural to assume that such a life-changing event could possibly happen to you, but the fact is that disability is quite common. Among 20-year-olds, more than 25 percent will become disabled before they turn 67, according to the Social Security Administration.

This means that, at some point, a good percentage of today’s adult workforce will eventually have to stop working due to a physical or mental disability. Whether due to a workplace injury, unrelated accident or the worsening of an existing condition, many people may someday need Social Security Disability benefits to supplement their income. Some of our readers could be among them.

Other people are born disabled, or develop a disability as a child. As a result, they cannot amass the work history necessary to qualify for SSD benefits. If they cannot work, they may have few financial resources, if any, when they grow up.

In those cases, Supplemental Security Income is likely an option. SSI benefits are for disabled adults and children who meet certain income requirements.

Some conditions are considered so severe that the SSA automatically considers a person with one of them to be disabled. Other conditions are not on the list. However, if the SSA determines that the applicant’s particular condition is equally severe to those on the list, the applicant may still qualify for SSD or SSI payments.

However, most applications are rejected initially, requiring an appeal. An SSD attorney can help with the process.

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