Spinal disc damage may qualify for SSDI

On Behalf of | Feb 1, 2022 | Social Security Disability

Missouri residents often perform job tasks that involve repeated lifting and twisting. If you experience back pain after years of doing the same type of work and it impairs your mobility, you may qualify for Social Security disability benefits.

Johns Hopkins Medicine describes degenerative disc disease as a condition that occurs when the spinal joints begin wearing out. It may happen due to several factors, including doing a lot of lifting and sustaining an injury that damages the spine.

Symptoms

The body heals itself by circulating blood, which delivers oxygen and nutrients. However, blood circulates less in the spinal discs is than in other parts of the body. As a result, the body cannot repair damage when it occurs. Symptoms of damaged discs include the following:

  • Weakness in the legs
  • Tingling or numbness in the arms and legs
  • Crippling pain in the thighs, buttocks, back or neck
  • Severe pain that lasts days to months
  • Pain when sitting, standing, walking or running
  • Reduced pain levels when lying down

The location of the pain varies, depending on the damaged disc. You may benefit from non-invasive treatment options, such as pain management techniques, acupuncture and a back brace. In severe cases, you may need disc replacement or other surgical procedures.

Eligibility

The Social Security Administration includes degenerative disc disease as one of the many musculoskeletal conditions covered by SSD. However, you must meet several requirements to qualify. If your impairment affects your ability to continue performing the work you completed in the past, you may be eligible for SSD. If your disability lasts for at least 12 months and you cannot walk or function normally due to debilitating pain, you may become eligible for SSD.

The processes and requirements for Social Security disability are often time-consuming and complex. Understanding your options and meeting the application deadlines is critical when applying for SSD. Once approved, it may help you pay for the medical care you need.

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