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Social Security Administration News Archives

Administration partnering with providers to give faster service

The Social Security Administration is in the midst of partnering with health care providers and hospitals across the country in order to be able to access medical records via a secure electronic communication. This ongoing program may one day help Missouri residents who find themselves needing to apply for disability benefits.

Understanding Supplemental Security Income

Supplemental Security Income or SSI is an alternate disability benefits option for those without the necessary work history to qualify for Social Security disability insurance benefits. SSI benefits are for disabled individuals who are unable to work because of a physical or mental disability and have limited income and resources.

Changes to disability applications may create challenges

Social Security disability claims are already challenging, however, new rules that recently went into effect may make it even more difficult to obtain these badly needed benefits. The new rules eliminate what is referred to as the treating-physician rule, which historically provided significant deference to a report from a physician that accompanied a claim for benefits. The rule required those reviewing SSD claims for benefits to give significant weight to the physician's report.

The basics of Supplemental Security Income for disability

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is an option for disabled, aged and blind individuals who are unable to work to consider. Unlike Social Security Disability, eligibility for which is based on work history, SSI claims are made by disabled individuals and others who qualify who have limited income and resources. In addition to meeting the Social Security Administration's (SSA) requirements for income and need, individuals applying for Supplemental Security Income based on disability must meet the SSA's requirements for disability.

What is Supplemental Security Income?

The Social Security Administration or SSA administers a number of programs intended to assist Missourians who are disabled or financially impoverished. One of the most used programs is called Supplemental Security Income or SSI, but few people understand how the program works.

Understanding the Social Security disability appeals process

Understanding the Social Security disability appeals process is important for disabled individuals and their families who rely on resources made available to those suffering with a disability that results in an inability to work. In general, Social Security disability (SSD) benefits are available to individuals suffering from a medical condition that lasts longer than 12 months, or is expected to result in death, which renders them unable to work or perform gainful activity. In addition, to qualify for SSD benefits, the disabled individual must meet the work history requirement, however, additional options, such as Supplemental Security Income, may be available to disabled individuals who do not meet the work history requirement.

Applicants for SSD benefits often wait years for appeal results

The Social Security Administration (SSA) encourages unsuccessful applicants for disability benefits to avail themselves of the various appellate procedures that it offers. Many persons in Missouri have followed this advice, but they often wait many months or even years to receive a decision after the appeal hearing is concluded. Information emerging from the SSA now shows that this experience is not unique.

Report: growth in SSD recpient rolls is over

A new report from a Social Security Administration committee suggests that the growth in Social Security Disability recipients is over, and seeks to explain the cause for the growth in the first place. These findings come as Congress continues to grapple with how to keep the SSD program’s trust fund from running out in 2016.

How SSA can take away SSD benefits after awarding them

Successfully applying for Social Security Disability benefits can be complicated and time-consuming, but once the payments begin, you may feel like the ordeal is finally over. Not so fast -- sooner or later, the Social Security Administration is going to want to check in with you, to see if you are still legally disabled.

3 things to do, in case the SSD trust runs dry in 2016

Time is running out to fix the Social Security Disability system’s financial problems. According to a trustees’ report discussed by USA TODAY, the SSD trust fund will run out of money in 2016. This could mean that people in Missouri who receive SSD or SSI benefits could see their payments reduced by 19 percent about a year from now.

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