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8 reasons SSD applications get rejected, part 1

We have spoken before in this blog about how difficult it can be to get your initial application for Social Security Disability benefits approved. In fact, the Social Security Administration appears to be getting stricter than ever. The agency, which administrates the SSD program, approved more than half of applications submitted in 1999. Last year, they approved just one third of applications, according to The Motley Fool.

Even legitimate claims sometimes get turned down, which means many disabled people in Missouri must file an appeal to get the payments they deserve. There are several reasons the SSA might reject a claim. Here are three common reasons. We will discuss the rest mentioned in The Motley Fool article next week.

1. Lack of “working credits.” As we discussed in our previous post, to qualify for SSD benefits, an applicant must have worked a certain number of years, and have done so sufficiently recently, depending on his or her age.

2. Too much income. The SSA sets a maximum monthly income applicants may be receiving, including from investments and workers’ compensation. For 2015, most applicants cannot be making more than $1,090 a month, on average.

3. The SSA does not consider you disabled. The agency will not consider a condition to be a disability unless it has lasted, or is expected to last, at least 12 months, or will result in the applicant’s death. In addition, the SSA maintains a list of conditions it considers to be disabling; if yours is not on the list, you likely are out of luck, no matter how debilitating it is.

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