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Obesity at 25 good indication of morbid obesity after 35

As we all know, obesity has become quite common in Missouri, along with the rest of the country. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 35 percent of people over the age of 20 are obese. The condition is also a big problem among teenagers; 18.4 percent of people between 12 and 19 are obese.

Many people with obesity find the condition to be physically debilitating. The Social Security Administration considers obesity a qualifying disability for Social Security Disability benefits purposes, if it causes other conditions that take away the applicant’s ability to work.

Being obese as a young adult may lead to even greater weight problems within a few years, according to a new study. In addition, obesity in your 20s could be a good indicator of cardiovascular and metabolic problems in your 30s.

Researchers examined data from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1999 to 2010. They found that women who were obese at age 25 had a 46.9 percent chance of being having class III obesity after they turn 35. Class III obesity is defined as having a body mass index above 40. By comparison, just 4.8 percent of women of normal weight at 25 were class III obese after 10 years.

Men who were obese at 25 also had a higher risk of becoming class III obese after 35, though the percentage, 23.1 percent, is not as high. The difference between them and normal-weight 25-year-olds was still dramatic, though; only 1.1 percent of the latter group had been diagnosed with class III obesity later in life.

In addition to the risk of severe obesity, the obese subjects were also more likely to develop hypertension, diabetes and other chronic disorders.

Source: Medical News Today, “Obesity by age 25 linked to severe late-life obesity,” May 6, 2014

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