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The stigma of mental illness and SSD benefits

Mental illness is a very serious medical issue that millions of Americans suffer from. In fact, one in five adults living in the U.S. has a mental illness, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 

The number of Americans suffering from a mental illness has increased during the last few decades. Despite the increase in mental illness in the U.S., there is still a stigma associated with people who suffer from a mental illness. This makes it harder for people with mental illnesses to get the support and treatment necessary to live a healthy life. 

While it is troubling that mental illness still carries a strong stigma, Americans with mental illnesses may be eligible to receive Social Security disability benefits. There are several different mental disorders and illnesses that qualify for SSD benefits, but the most common types of mental disorders in the U.S. are anxiety disorders and depression. 

Roughly 45 million Americans have a mental illness in the U.S., with 11.5 million adults having a serious mental illness that requires medical treatment and possible therapy. With so many people suffering from mental illness, it is important for these individuals to understand that they may be able to receive SSD benefits if they can no longer work due to their illness.

SSD benefits can help individuals pay for monthly expenses including housing, food and medical care. Applying for SSD benefits can be complicated so it may be beneficial to work with an SSD attorney to understand the application process. SSD benefits can be very helpful for individuals with mental illnesses. Don't let the stigma follow you around any longer and take advantage of the benefits that may be available right now. 

Source: Business Insider, "Some Alarming Facts About Mental Illness In America," Pamela Engel, Oct. 10, 2013

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